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Parents of introverted children inevitably confront the challenge of helping their children stay physically and mentally active. The world is made for extroverts, who are the active life of any party and the center of attention everywhere they go. Introverted kids get less attention, less time in the spotlight, and perhaps more criticism than their extroverted siblings.

Activities to Help Your Introverted Child Stay Physically and Mentally Active

One result can be social marginalization, which is a real problem for introverted children. As parents, we can’t eliminate everything that might make our introverted children feel socially awkward. But here are some activities that can help your introvert get active:

Parents of introverted children inevitably confront the challenge of helping their children stay physically and mentally active. The world is made for extroverts,

Taking an art class

Taking art classes is always a good idea for your child. It doesn’t matter if they’re introverted or extroverted – all children have a creative side that needs to be recognized, nurtured, and brought to the surface.

Getting them to explore their strengths will strengthen their brain power and teach them that there’s no one path in life, as many people have different aspects of themselves that are realized through specific tasks and activities.

Playing an instrument

If your child is introverted, it may be hard for them to get out and be social. That doesn’t mean they can’t still have fun. Playing an instrument is an excellent way for introverts to get involved with their friends and create something beautiful. It also gives them a chance to express themselves in a less demanding way than talking or writing.

Writing blogs or recording vlogs.

It’s easy for introverted children to slip into undesirable solo activities, like playing video games or watching TV. These are fun but don’t help them foster real-world relationships and communication skills. Instead, find proactive ways for your introverted children to interact with others:

Introverts may not like the spotlight but love the written word. Encourage your child to write short articles, blog posts, or short stories. If they’re into video, have them create a YouTube channel and make videos about their interests (e.g., science experiments). They only need a computer, internet connection, camera or phone, and a video editing tool.

This way, they can start recording themselves and only upload it if they are ready. They have total control over what they want others to see. This can significantly help with their self-esteem too. 

Going on solo nature walks

Nature walks are great for getting your child outside and enjoying the fresh air while giving them some quiet time to reflect on things or enjoy nature. Whether they do it alone or with friends, taking a nature walk is an excellent way for your child to exercise while also getting away from the hustle and bustle of modern life. Plus, it’s free!

Having a virtual book club

A virtual book club is precisely what it sounds like: A group of people who read and discuss books online. And since it’s virtual, there’s no need to leave the house or spend money on travel costs or restaurants. You can even do this with people who live far away — as long as you have an internet connection, you’re good to go!

Child on zoom call with other children : Parents of introverted children inevitably confront the challenge of helping their children stay physically and mentally active. The world is made for extroverts

Playing with pets

Pets are an excellent way for introverts to get out of their shells. They’re more than just companions:

  • They’re great listeners.
  • They don’t expect anything from you.
  • They’re an endless source of entertainment.

Pets can be beneficial if your child has trouble speaking up in class or joining new groups at school. They can also encourage your child to be more active when they might otherwise not have been motivated to do so.

If your child is an introvert, chances are they’ll enjoy playing with a pet — even if it’s just watching them or feeding them. If your child has a dog or cat at home, consider taking it out on long walks around the neighborhood together so they can get some exercise while bonding with their pet.

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Cooking

Cooking is an excellent way for your child to get involved in the kitchen and learn about healthy eating habits. It’s also a way for her to spend time with you while learning new skills and making memories together. Try making something simple like grilled cheese sandwiches or scrambled eggs. You could even try something more ambitious like preparing a meal together!

Cooking doesn’t have to be complicated or time-consuming. If your child is interested in cooking, try making something simple like scrambled eggs. Use a recipe so your child can follow along step by step, and make sure they’re safe when using sharp knives or hot stoves. This can also be an opportunity for bonding if you take turns helping each other with the task.

Takeaway: Activities to Help Your Introverted Child

An active lifestyle is a crucial component of overall wellness and will help your child develop healthy habits for life! While some extracurricular activities may seem overwhelming to parents, remember that you can always start with baby steps and gradually increase the intensity over time. You will work towards optimal health by staying active and encouraging your child to do the same.

Remember that the key for children is to find what works best for them. Most kids will have a preferred time of day when they are most energized and a time of year when they love playing outside. A parent must draw from these strengths and present opportunities that align with their child’s preferences. The benefit to children is an environment where they can recharge, learn new skills, and connect with others with similar interests.

Alicia Trautwein is an Autism advocate, writer, motivational speaker, and dedicated mom of four. Alicia’s desire to advocate for Autism comes from her own autism diagnosis and that of her three children, niece, and brother. Her life’s mission is to educate on autism acceptance and change the world for future generations of autistic individuals.

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