Strong emotions define the teenage years. As a mom of four, I can say I have had my fair share and still have many more years of navigating teenage emotions. When it comes to communicating their emotions, this is not an area that teens come into the world knowing how to express. They learn along the way. They have big moments, and sometimes, these can lead to even more significant reactions. I have had my fair share of door slams, being yelled at, and even complete shutdowns. 

Communicating their emotions

The most memorable of these teenage milestones seem to revolve most often around relationships. Whether friend or romantic interest, teens deal with many emotions that they are still learning how to react to. When their home is their safe place, teenagers will often lash out at those who love them most. In these moments, what they need most is a place of no judgment and their parent’s love and support.

While we may not have all the answers, that is not what our children need. What our children need in those moments, well, it’s us!

The thing is, these moments do not come with a manual. That is why I love having the Center for Parent and Teen Communication as a trusted resource for moments like these.

There are so many milestone moments for teens that we need to celebrate and be grateful as parents. 

My challenge to you today is to read all the milestones here and let me know about the ones you’ve experienced with your teens. Even if the moment did not go as well as you would have liked, it is essential to be grateful for that moment and learn from it as a parent. What steps did you take going forward, and what advice would you give to a parent entering those teenage years?


Let me know your answer in the comments, and be sure to sign up for CPTC’s 100-word, daily parenting tip newsletter (http://bit.ly/39KkWpR).

Alicia Trautwein is an Autism advocate, writer, motivational speaker, and dedicated mom of four. Alicia’s desire to advocate for Autism comes from her own autism diagnosis and that of her three children, niece, and brother. Her life’s mission is to educate on autism acceptance and change the world for future generations of autistic individuals.

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