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There comes a time in life as parents when our children start to grow up and push for more independence. Finding a balance of teaching your children while also trusting them as individuals can be challenging waters to navigate. Every parent should have a safe substance use talk with their kids. The talk should communicate with your children effectively and openly about drugs and alcohol.

Safe Substance Use: Why Parents Should Talk With Their Teens

In today’s society, where marijuana has become legal for recreational use, parents and legal guardians should research and ask themselves, is marijuana a gateway drug? Educating yourself before having these discussions can be beneficial to tackle all questions you might run into. Parents need to be honest with their children and provide accurate information to help them make informed decisions.

It is never too early to start talking about the dangers of substance abuse and underage drinking. Every parent should have a safe substance use talk with their kids. The talk should be about how to communicate with your children in an effective and open way about drugs and alcohol.

How to have the right conversation with your kids

It is never too early to start talking about the dangers of substance abuse and underage drinking. The sooner you can get in front of these topics, the better off your kids will be. Unfortunately, it’s not always easy to know what to say or how appropriate information is for a given age group.

First, let’s take a look at alcohol use among minors: Too many teens think they are invincible when it comes to substances like alcohol because they choose to ignore the signs of alcohol poisoning. Often teenagers will take shots without knowing how much alcohol is in them, or they end up drinking more than intended by accident. Some may even try to hide symptoms of alcohol poisoning by putting a blanket over the person or putting them in the shower to sleep it off.

Parents & Teens: Never Assume

The truth is teens should never assume this kind of behavior is expected. If you think your teen or someone they may know shows signs of alcohol poisoning, seek medical attention immediately. If you’re unsure, it is always better to be safe than sorry.

At the same time, it can be challenging to put the dangers of underage drinking into words that teens will understand. Parents need to strike a balance between being direct about the risks of underage drinking and being open to discussing why teens may feel inclined to drink or have access to alcohol. Although everyone wants their child to stay away from alcohol, the most effective way to avoid future problems with substance abuse is by starting a conversation.

How to keep communication open and effective

When it comes to drug abuse and its prevention, communication is vital. It’s essential to keep the lines of communication open with your children so that they feel comfortable coming to you with any questions or concerns they may have. You should also talk to them about the dangers of drug abuse and explain why it’s important to say no to peer pressure. Help them develop a strong sense of self-confidence, so they’ll be more likely to resist peer pressure. Be open to their questions, communicate with them, and be understanding of their needs.

Safe Substance Use

Parents should have a safe substance use talk with their kids. The talk should communicate with your children effectively and openly about drugs and alcohol. Parents need to be honest with their children and provide accurate information to help them make informed decisions.

The best way to communicate with your children about drug abuse is by being open, honest, and understanding their needs. Make sure you talk to them about the dangers of drug abuse, particularly how it can affect their lives. Emphasize that peer pressure can influence even the most well-adjusted kids. These are just some topics to discuss, including substance abuse talk with your children.

Alicia Trautwein is an Autism advocate, writer, motivational speaker, and dedicated mom of four. Alicia’s desire to advocate for Autism comes from her own autism diagnosis and that of her three children, niece, and brother. Her life’s mission is to educate on autism acceptance and change the world for future generations of autistic individuals.

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